Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

How much time do you spend on the web each day? If you live in North America, a new report says, probably a lot.

Canadian company Sandvine, in their global Internet Phenomena Report, confirmed that online data usage in North America has increased by 120% over the past year. Netflix makes up 33% of the traffic — a definite boost for the company since last year’s price hike angered many of its viewers.

Amazon
makes up 1.8% of downstream traffic, the report says, with Hulu at 1.4% and HBO GO at 0.5%. In total, all audio and video streaming services account for 65% of traffic between 9:00 p.m. and midnight.

File sharing network BitTorrent takes up 16% of traffic — but, Sandvine predicts, real-time entertainment’s rising popularity will size it down to 10% overall by 2015.

Facebook announced that it will be kicking off an advertising campaign to promote its brand, specifically targeting 13 countries including Brazil, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, Spain, U.K., and the U.S. The campaign will appear in 12 different languages and will be housed on Facebook itself initially. You can watch it here : https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=3802752155040

The social network said in a press release attached to the announcement that it wants to express “who we are and why we exist.” The campaign is the work of agency Wieden and Kennedy, Facebook’s existing agency of record, and the first video embedded below focuses primarily on chairs. Yes, the things you sit on.

The timing of this campaign’s launch, coming alongside the 1 billion user milestone, along with the countries it’s targeting initially, could indicate that Facebook wants to expand its brand presence in markets where it already has considerable penetration. The idea might be that additional outreach and marketing efforts can help it get past a potential growth plateau and reach even wider market saturation, possibly in less tech-savvy demographics. But the strategy seems initially aimed at existing users, so it could also be the case that this is an attempt to ramp up engagement and make Facebook users feel more connected and invested to the brand, and less likely to wander. Whatever the case, it’s a well-shot, well-edited video, and it’ll be interesting to see what else comes out of the promotional effort.

According to Wikipedia, learning analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimising learning and the environments in which it occurs. There are methods for learning analytics include, Social network analysis (SNA), Behavioral trust analysis and Personalization & Adaptation. Hereby there is a very interesting infographics from Open Colleges. Learning analytics as a tool to optimize learning methods for online students where they can use their highest performance. Enjoy reading and share your comments!

Here by find 12 courses you could take for a completely free TED degree in Big Ideas.

The Course: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
The School: Stanford, via YouTube
Taught By: Peter Norvig, Sebastian Thrun
Course Description: Artificial Intelligence is the science of making computer software that reasons about the world around it. Humanoid robots, Google Goggles, self-driving cars, even software that suggests music you might like to hear are all examples of AI. In this class, you will learn how to create this software from two of the leaders in the field.
Notes: When Thrun and Norvig first put this course online in the fall of 2011, 160,000 students from 209 countries enrolled. While the course is closed, you can still watch the lectures on YouTube. And see Norvig discuss what he learned teaching the course in the TEDTalk, “The 100,000 student classroom.”

The Course: The Structure of English Words
The School: Stanford, via iTunes
Taught By: Will Leben
Course Description: Thanks to historical, cultural, and linguistic factors, English has by far the world’s largest vocabulary—leading many of us to have greater than average difficulty with words, and some of us to have greater than average curiosity about words. Our historical and linguistic study will cover both erudite and everyday English, with special attention to word meaning and word use, to both rules and exceptions. Most words originated with an image. “Reveal” = “pull back the veil,” “depend” = “hang down from.” Change is constant. “Girl” once meant “a young child of either sex;” an early synonym for “stupid” was “nice.” Are there good changes and bad ones? And who gets to decide?

The Course: Physics for Future Presidents
The School: University of California Berkeley, via YouTube
Taught By: Richard A. Muller and Bob Jacobsen
Course Description: Contains the essential physics that students need in order to understand today’s core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. From the physics of energy to climate change, and from spy technology to quantum computers, this is a look at the modern physics affecting the decisions of political leaders and CEOs and, consequently, the lives of every citizen. How practical are alternative energy sources? Can satellites really read license plates from space? What is the quantum physics behind iPods and supermarket scanners? And how much should we fear a terrorist nuke?”
Note: A complete guide is available to anyone who wants to teach the class at their university.

The Course: Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Erica James
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

The Course: Videogame Theory and Analysis
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Alice Robison
Course Description: This course will serve as an introduction to the interdisciplinary academic study of videogames, examining their cultural, educational, and social functions in contemporary settings. By playing, analyzing, and reading and writing about videogames, we will examine debates surrounding how they function within socially situated contexts in order to better understand games’ influence on and reflections of society.

The Course: Sets, Counting and Probability
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Paul G. Bamberg
Course Description: This online math course develops the mathematics needed to formulate and analyze probability models for idealized situations drawn from everyday life. Topics include elementary set theory, techniques for systematic counting, axioms for probability, conditional probability, discrete random variables, infinite geometric series, and random walks. Applications to card games like bridge and poker, to gambling, to sports, to election results, and to inference in fields like history and genealogy, national security, and theology.

The Course: Introduction to Aerospace Engineering and Design
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Dava Newman
Course Description: The fundamental concepts, and approaches of aerospace engineering, are highlighted through lectures on aeronautics, astronautics, and design. Active learning aerospace modules make use of information technology. Student teams are immersed in a hands-on, lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle design project, where they design, build, and fly radio-controlled LTA vehicles. The connections between theory and practice are realized in the design exercises.

The Course: Shakespeare After All: The Later Plays
The School: Harvard
Taught By: Marjorie Garber
Course Description: This free online Shakespeare course focuses on Shakespeare’s later plays beginning with Measure for Measure and ending with The Tempest. This course takes note of key themes, issues, and interpretations of the plays, focusing on questions of genre, gender, politics, family relations, silence and speech, and cultural power from both above and below (royalty, nobility, and the court; clowns and fools).

The Course: Securing Digital Democracy
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: J. Alex Halderman
Course Description: Computer technology has transformed how we participate in democracy. The way we cast our votes, the way our votes are counted, and the way we choose who will lead are increasingly controlled by invisible computer software. Most U.S. states have adopted electronic voting, and countries around the world are starting to collect votes over the Internet. However, computerized voting raises startling security risks that are only beginning to be understood outside the research lab, from voting machine viruses that can silently change votes to the possibility that hackers in foreign countries could steal an election. This course will provide the technical background and public policy foundation that 21st century citizens need to understand the electronic voting debate. You’ll come away from this course understanding why you can be confident your own vote will count — or why you should reasonably be skeptical.

The Course: Galaxies and Cosmology
The School: California Institute of Technology, via Coursera
Taught By: S. George Djorgovski
Course Description: This class is an introduction to the modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, i.e., the part of astrophysics that deals with the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. It will cover the subjects including: relativistic cosmological models and their parameters, extragalactic distance scale, cosmological tests, composition of the universe, dark matter, and dark energy; the hot big bang, cosmic nucleosynthesis, recombination, and cosmic microwave background; formation and evolution of structure in the universe; galaxy clusters, large-scale structure and its evolution; galaxies, their properties and fundamental correlations; formation and evolution of galaxies; star formation history of the universe; quasars and other active galactic nuclei, and their evolution; structure and evolution of the intergalactic medium; diffuse extragalactic backgrounds; the first stars, galaxies, and the reionization era.

The Course: Fantasy and Science Fiction: The Human Mind, Our Modern World
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: Eric Rabkin
Course Description: Fantasy is a key term both in psychology and in the art and artifice of humanity. The things we make, including our stories, reflect, serve, and often shape our needs and desires. We see this everywhere from fairy tale to kiddie lit to myth; from “Cinderella” to Alice in Wonderland to Superman; from building a fort as a child to building ideal, planned cities as whole societies. Fantasy in ways both entertaining and practical serves our persistent needs and desires and illuminates the human mind. Fantasy expresses itself in many ways, from the comfort we feel in the godlike powers of a fairy godmother to the seductive unease we feel confronting Dracula. This course will explore Fantasy in general and Science Fiction in specific both as art and as insights into ourselves and our world.

The Course: Bits: The Computer Science of Digital Information
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Harry R. Lewis
Course Description: This course focuses on information as quantity, resource, and property. We study the application of quantitative methods to understanding how information technologies inform issues of public policy, regulation, and law. How are music, images, and telephone conversations represented digitally, and how are they moved reliably from place to place through wires, glass fibers, and the air? Who owns information, who owns software, what forms of regulation and law restrict the communication and use of information, and does it matter? How can personal privacy be protected at the same time that society benefits from communicated or shared information?

I am honored to share this event since I am one of the official blogger of MRMW- Market Research Mobile World Asia Pasific 2013. If you follow MMA which is the premier global non-profit trade association representing all players in the mobile marketing value chain, you may hear about Market Research Mobile World too.

Mobile has a strategic position in our lives. To take a deeper look at mobile market in Asia, lets check how MRMW explains:

Smartphone adoption and usage continues to soar in Asia. According to the recent Mobile Planet study (2012), smartphones are becoming increasingly indispensable to Asian consumers. 54% of smartphone owners from China would rather give up their TV than a smartphone. In Japan 100% of smartphone owners use their mobile device to research products or services. These mobile trends provide businesses with an exceptional opportunity to rethink how to reach the new mobile consumers, interact with them and generate insights for marketing, branding and new product development.

The Market Research in the Mobile World will be an exciting and impactful event comprising of presentations from distinguished experts around the world and wide-ranging contributions on the current state-of-the-art and the future of mobile insight generation in Asia-Pacific markets.

That’s so true. Can you imagine a day without an access to internet from your mobile or laptop.

Google is going to sell a 7-inch tablet for $200 in an attempt to take down the Kindle Fire as the second most popular tablet after the iPad.

Gizmodo Australia viewed a training document on the tablet and scooped up all the big details.

Here are the key points:
It will be called the “Nexus 7.”
It will have 1 GB of RAM.
It comes in 8 GB model for $199, and 16 GB for $250.
It’s built by Asus.
It supports Google Wallet, and NFC.
9 hours battery life.