Posts Tagged ‘2012’

On February 29th, Facebook revealed big plans for the mobile platform, including that the new Timeline format for brands will also be available on the mobile platform. The game changing updates mean that for users of other social media marketing platforms, the message for 2012 will be: we need to get ready for mobile.

Let’s recap the announcements Facebook made and what they mean for your brand:
Timeline for brands will also be functional in the mobile platform (but will be made available at an unspecified date in 2012)

Implications for brands: Where brands can currently launch mobile-optimized marketing campaigns that users can access from their smart devices, soon users will be able to experience the same exact workflow on their desktop as on their smart phone. The new Timeline format for brands, once available on the mobile network, will enable page managers to curate an identical experience for all users, regardless of how they’re accessing branded content on Facebook. This means a big impact on your brand’s reach, especially as we consider that nearly half of the active Facebook user population interacts with the network from their mobile device.
Sponsored Stories now appear in the mobile feed as well

Implications for brands: To date, there has been no advertising reach to any Facebook users on mobile devices. In light of the fact that approximately 450 million Facebook users interact with the network using a mobile device, this was an enormous opportunity lost to marketers— until now. Sponsored Story ad units are the only ones being released to mobile Timelines— this means that promoting these “organic word of mouth” advertising units will become a major part of every marketers mission.

In a sense, it’s a bit silly to call 2012 the Year of Mobile because every year since the release of Apple’s ill-fated Newton has been the Year of Mobile. We have always been moving toward computing devices that are smaller, faster, and cheaper. According to research by Morgan Stanley, the number of people who access the Internet primarily from mobile devices will surpass desktop users sometime in 2013.

On June 30 2012 at 23:59:60 UTC a leap second will make the day one second longer. The leap second is inserted between 23:59:59 and 00:00:00 UTC to compensate for variations in the rotation of the Earth.

Most clocks will just ignore the leap second, but Time.is will count all the way up to 60 seconds!

The leap second does not occur on June 30 everywhere! The date and time depends on your time zone. In Trabzon the leap second will occur at 02:59:60 1 Temmuz 2012, Pazar. To check other locations, use the search box above.

Remember to set your clock one second back after the leap second! http://time.is/leapsecond2012

I believe this motto or I want to believe in this, this is a given extra second! So I ll make a wish for a better world, please share this !

Facebook’ s huge growth is against to business books. We havent been told this at college. No company can gain profit over profit. Now, they announced that their  first-quarter earnings and revenue declined from the fourth quarter, as a surge in spending on marketing and product research ahead of its initial public offering.

For the March ended quarter, Facebook posted total revenue of $1.06 billion up 45% from the same period last year but down 6% from the fourth quarter. The sequential decline in revenue came despite a steady increase in monthly active users to 901 million, from 845 million in December.

The social network, which makes the majority of its revenue from advertising, has attracted some potential investors for the rocketing growth of its advertising business, but encountered some seasonality in that business.

Facebook, in its regulatory filing, said average revenue per user, or ARPU, declined 12% from the fourth quarter. The company attributed the decline to “seasonal trends” and the fact that user growth was higher in markets where it generates less revenue per user.

It’s easy to forget that, despite the massive growth of smartphones in recent years, mobile marketing is still relatively young and marketers are still trying to get to grips with the format. However, its importance for marketers continues to grow and while it’s far too early to say whether it’ll explode like some analysts are suggesting, it’s still a sector that will continue to expand over the coming years. The latest report relating to this, most specifically search advertising, comes from search marketers Marin Software and its report “The State of Mobile Search Advertising In the US”.

As part of their findings, Marin has estimated that by December 2012, mobile devices will account for roughly 25 per cent of all paid-search clicks on Google. Marin also estimate that of the total ad spent that Google will receive, 23 per cent of this will originate from mobile campaigns, 45 per cent of this figures will originate from tablet devices.

Another area that was analysed was the click through rate (CTR) and the cost per click (CPC) across the different devices. For 2011, smartphones had the highest average CTR with 4.12 per cent in comparison to desktops which only had 2.39 per cent, showing that smartphone users were more likely to click on ads. Also the average CPC was found to be cheaper for smartphones too ($0.53 per click), the average CPC for desktops was found to be $0.83 per click.

However the parts were smartphones begin to falter is in the conversion and the cost of conversion. Both tablets and desktop computers outperformed smartphones in average conversion rate, (smartphones have an average conversion rate of 2.0 per cent in comparisons to desktop’s 5.2 per cent), as well as having a higher average cost per conversion.

 

However, despite these findings, Marin say that more research and analysis is required before any conclusions can be brought forward:

“Being inherently mobile, smartphones are used differently and many of their conversions could happen in a physical store, making them harder to track. Additionally, the rise of shopping apps makes conversion tracking more complex. As such, the value of smartphone advertising is more dependent on the type of advertiser and product, and marketers should keep an open mind about their efficacy.”

Although it’s hard to say how exactly mobile advertising will pan out, a theory for the higher click through rates could be because that while desktop ads on Google are numerous and smaller, smartphone ads take up the entire screen as Google Ads are usually the first two results you see whenever you search for something.

 

 

 

 

Google, Facebook, Youtube and Windows Live still  dominate Turkish web market in February 2012.

Continue reading : http://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/TR

When Twitter buys a startup, it’s often after the company’s staff, not its product — which makes Twitter’s latest takeover one of its most intriguing. Twitter announced late Monday that it has acquired blogging platform Posterous.

Launched in 2008, Posterous — like its archrival Tumblr — pioneered the “microblogging” space. Its specialty is content that’s longer than a tweet but shorter than a traditional blog post. The services are especially good for sharing photos, videos, quotes and other multimedia snippets. Posterous’ staff of 21 previously worked out of a San Francisco headquarters just two miles from Twitter’s home base. They joined Twitter’s staff this week.

Is Twitter looking to venture beyond its famous 140-character limit, into the broader microblogging world?

The early signs are no. Twitter is keeping Posterous up and running, at least for the time being, but its staff is being redeployed on other projects. “We are welcoming a very talented group of engineers, product managers and others,” a Twitter spokeswoman said. “They will be working on several initiatives that will make Twitter even better.”

 

2011 saw a surge in mobile users, but 2012 is the year when smartphone owners become the majority of users, currently hovering just below 50% of U.S. mobile phone users. Tablets, too, take center stage with a near 24% CAGR in adoption.

 

  • Tablets comprise 7% of population of all mobile devices owners
  • Android users spend on average 1.24 hours daily engaging with the device
  • 77% of smartphone users put their phone to work while shopping
  • 58% of adults are somewhat or very likely to make a purchase on their smartphone (this will only become standard one day)

One of the biggest areas impacted by this constant change in market dynamics is of course retail. This past holiday season only proved the point. Consumers scanned barcodes or QR codes to check prices nearby and online. And, before they would consider finalizing the purchase, they would ask for a little help from their friends by taking to social networks or review sites to validate decisions.

Avoiding Mistakes and How to Win

1. Align mobile with other key teams

Winning mobile teams are tightly aligned with marketing loyalty programs (if applicable) and e-commerce teams. For example, Starbucks built its wildly successful application not around revenue or loyalty card adhesion, but instead around ease of purchase.

2. Focus on what the user needs

Mobile strategies should be holistic and remain focused on what users are seeking. Informational apps may seem simple in design, but a solid strategy seeks to solve the “information” problem, not just the “mobile” problem.

3. Allocate the resources necessary to make mobile successful

Allocation of the necessary resources at U.S. pharmacy and convenience retailer Walgreens is at the forefront of everything the company does in mobile. The Walgreens app used the mobile device’s camera to scan a prescription barcode to initiate a refill, is an example of “multichannel lite” activity.

4. Mobile means multiple platforms

One of the few retailers profiled that has built a tablet and smartphone version of its app along with a fully featured mobile website, Zappos, worked many processes in parallel to get its application off the ground.