Posts Tagged ‘Marketing’

At the recent MRMW conference held in Amsterdam, Elias Veris from Insites Consulting showed how a mobile MROC application can boost responses and allow observational tasks to be included in community research. In this follow-up article, he discusses how people are using their smart phones and what are the core drivers for using it.

A couple of weeks ago, the MRMW conference took place in Amsterdam. A fine event, with many bright minds talking on how to use mobile as a method. I had the opportunity to present about mobile in MROC’s there too (the presentation is available here) and tremendously enjoyed the discussions I had with many of the other delegates. What struck me however, is how almost all discussions were about the method of mobile, and only very little were about mobile as ‘content’. In other words, how can we in the market research industry help our clients really understand how to use this new era of connectedness in their daily marketing practices?

To kick this discussion off, we have recently conducted a study among 800 + smartphone users in 4 countries (US, UK, The Netherlands and Belgium). Our aim? Finding out how smartphone users use their phone, and what the real drivers are of using it. And, how can brands tap into the power of mobile?


Check the full report here:

Social media is pervasive in the U.S. and is becoming increasingly integrated into the entire media landscape. From a consumer point of view, people use social networks in a few primary ways:

Connection: Facebook is far and away the most popular social platform; as it’s grown over the last 8 years, Facebook has gone from connecting college classmates to being the central social network. Facebook’s wide reach means many people are becoming more selective about what they share, and have higher standards for what they consider relevant or interesting on the platform.

Nicheworks: More active social users are turning to what we call “nicheworks” that have a more specialized interest or functionality and smaller circle of sharing. Sometimes this means sharing similar information, but more in-depth or with a different audience (for example, professional information on LinkedIn). Other platforms, like Instagram or Pinterest, are focused more on image sharing where users upload and post content based on certain topics – like recipes, crafts, travel, or other hobbies and interests.

Discovery & Sharing: Twitter is the most open information platform and has become a cascade of data consisting of personal updates, news and politics, and TV. But it also tends to be the sharing platform of choice for users of nicheworks: when those users create or find something cool, they share it more broadly on Twitter. As Twitter has grown both as a “pure-play” social medium and as a distributor for many smaller networks’ updates, it’s become a microcosm of what’s happening across nearly all of social – and traditional – media.

What do consumers think about brands using social media to reach them? What challenges do brands face in the U.S. when using social media?

Consumers are tolerant of brands but tend to be somewhat transactional in terms of what they want in exchange for their “likes” – they want something back for their attention. Ultimately, almost no one voluntarily wants to interact with ads, so it’s up to brands to change their messaging strategies to offer something genuinely interactive and interesting. This also means brands must have a much stronger arsenal of content at the ready, and they need to be limber and experimental in how they deploy it.

According to Socialbakers’s report, in May, the Facebook Mobile application for mobile devices had 488 million users. Four months later, Facebook demonstrates the power of mobile by hitting 543 million monthly active users out of their 955 million strong Facebook community, resulting in a 57% penetration!

North America continues to be the strongest Facebook Mobile continent with over 161 million monthly active users and South Africa, Nigeria and Japan still rule the ranking of the countries with the highest Facebook Mobile penetration.

Facebook for Android has grown the most in absolute numbers (22.5 million new users) and iPad increased its mobile Facebook base by 45%! Now that Timeline is available for iPad, it will be interesting to see how the numbers grow. Let’s check more Socialbakers’s exclusive infographics!

New survey results reveal that more people believe in the 4 P’s as opposed to the 4 C’s. So here I bring you a special variation of the 4P’s. Share your comments if you “get it”.

Do you know how old the average Twitter or Facebook user is? Do you know what share of Reddit’s users are women? We could go on and on; when it comes to social network demographics, the questions are endless. This research is going to answer those questions for you, showing you the age and gender distribution on 24 of today’s most popular social networks and online communities.

Average age distribution

If you average the age distribution across all the sites in the survey, this here below is what you end up with. You could think of it as the age distribution in the social media sphere.

Age distribution per site

When it comes age distibution among social media networkds, the youngest site is at the top.

This chart should make something very clear; social media is most definitely not just for the young. Some examples:

55% of Twitter users are 35 or older.
63% of Pinterest users are 35 or older.
65% of Facebook users are 35 or older.
79% of LinkedIn users are 35 or older.

Average user age per site

Based on the sites in this survey, the estimated age of the average social media user is just under 37 years old. Here are some other observations:

The oldest users: LinkedIn has the oldest user base, with the average user being 44.2 years old.

The average Facebook user is 40.5 years old.

The average Twitter user is 37.3 years old.

The age trend for Facebook and Twitter. Compared to a previous survey which was conducted 2.5 years ago, the age of the average Facebook user has gone up two years, while the age of the average Twitter user has gone down two years. In other words, Twitter’s user base is getting younger, while Facebook’s is getting older.

What about gender?

Based on the United States demographics data (from Ad Planner) there is a clear gender imbalance on many of these sites. Some are much more male dominated, and vice versa. However, when you look at all the data together, it becomes clear that women rule social media. More than two thirds of the sites in this survey have more female than male users.

17 out of 24 sites (71%) have more female than male users.

The average gender distribution is 48.75% male, 51.25% female.

Most male-dominated site? Slashdot (87% males) is the standout, followed by Hacker News (77% males) and Stack Overflow (76% males). In general, the more tech-focused sites in this survey have more male users than female.
Most female-dominated site? Pinterest (79% females) is in a league of its own, followed by Goodreads (70% females) and Blogger (66% females).

Facebook and Twitter have the same gender distribution: 40% male, 60% female.

I am honored to share this event since I am one of the official blogger of MRMW- Market Research Mobile World Asia Pasific 2013. If you follow MMA which is the premier global non-profit trade association representing all players in the mobile marketing value chain, you may hear about Market Research Mobile World too.

Mobile has a strategic position in our lives. To take a deeper look at mobile market in Asia, lets check how MRMW explains:

Smartphone adoption and usage continues to soar in Asia. According to the recent Mobile Planet study (2012), smartphones are becoming increasingly indispensable to Asian consumers. 54% of smartphone owners from China would rather give up their TV than a smartphone. In Japan 100% of smartphone owners use their mobile device to research products or services. These mobile trends provide businesses with an exceptional opportunity to rethink how to reach the new mobile consumers, interact with them and generate insights for marketing, branding and new product development.

The Market Research in the Mobile World will be an exciting and impactful event comprising of presentations from distinguished experts around the world and wide-ranging contributions on the current state-of-the-art and the future of mobile insight generation in Asia-Pacific markets.